Compound subjects with possessive

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Bob and Sally bought a house. Congratulations! Now they want to send out an invitation to their housewarming party. Should the invitation read: You’re invited to Bob and Sally’s housewarming party. Or: You’re invited to Bob’s and Sally’s housewarming party.
There is a clear rule for this. With a compound subject (two nouns joined by “and”) we only put the apostrophe on the second. If Bob and Sally want people to come to their party and not complain about grammar errors, then the invitation should read: You’re invited to Bob and Sally’s housewarming party.
However, if Bob and Sally had different groups of friends, some of whom didn’t like to mix, and others who got on quiet well and they decided to have separate housewarming parties, but with a single invitation for those invited to both parties, the single invitation would read, “You’re invited to Bob’s and Sally’s housewarming parties. (See what length grammar teachers will go to imagine a situation that fits the grammar rule we are trying to demonstrate?)
The great thing about language is that the rules exist to express any kind of hypothetical situation.