Free Grammar Help: A run-on sentence

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Ariana asks the following grammar question,

Aggressive advertisements can backfire that’s why marketing directors consider them carefully

First, it’s a run-on sentence. This type of run-on sentence is called a “fused sentence” since there is no punctuation used to connect the two thoughts.

Here are three ways to fix a run-on sentence.

Use a semicolon.

Aggressive advertisements can backfire; that’s why marketing directors consider them carefully.

Add a period and a capital to create two short sentences.

Aggressive advertisements can backfire. That’s why marketing directors consider them carefully.

Use a comma and a conjunction.

Aggressive advertisements can backfire, so that’s why marketing directors consider them carefully.

My preference for this run-on sentence would be the semicolon solution. It creates a sentence with parallel structure, which helps the reader connect the logic. However, in my editing work, I sometimes come across clients whose writing is just full of run-on sentences. For those writers, I vary the way I fix the sentences, since a variety of sentence types makes for better writing.

About Peter J. Francis

Peter J. Francis is owner and operator of HyperGraphix Publishing Services (HGPublishing.com). He has over 30 years of professional writing and editing experience. He holds a BA (Honors) degree in English (1987), a B. Ed. degree from SFU (2005) and a certificate in Special Education from SFU (2011). He teaches high school and offers editing services as time is available.