Parts of speech in questions

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Sometimes it can be difficult to identify the parts of speech in a question because the syntax (word order) can be changed.

Andrew asks the following:

Can you diagram this sentence for me, please? I’m specifically trying to understand the direct and indirect object.
“What do you want me to say?”

I agree this is tricky.

I found this site that diagrams interrogative sentences: http://www.english-grammar-revolution.com/interrogative-sentence.html

They suggest turning the sentence around to a declarative form:
You want me to say what.

This is an unusual way to express a desire in English, but it makes more clear which actions belong to which subjects.
The main¬†subject is “you.” The main verb is “want.”¬†The action of the sentence you wanting. It’s the same as “You want lunch.”
So the direct object is “me.”

The part that people have difficulty with is finding the indirect object. The indirect object is the object of the verb that is not the main verb. That means the main verb is having an action on another verb, and that verb is having an action on an object.

The indirect object is “what. This is similar to a sentence like: “You want me to play golf.” The subject is “you.” The main verb is “want.” The object of the main verb is “me.” But now the second verb is “play” and the object of the second verb is “golf.”

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